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Martin Vedani

When did you know you wanted to be an airline pilot?

When I was about 10 years old, my parents took my brother and I on a short sightseeing flight around the outskirts of Buenos Aires on C172. That’s all it took, I fell in love with aviation right there and then, and ever since then I knew that I wanted to fly.

When and where did you first learn to fly?

I completed PPL and CPL flight school in Argentina where I had the chance to visit a lot of the provinces during cross country navigations while time building.

What do you think your favourite thing about being an airline pilot will be?

What I think I will enjoy the most will be the feeling of each flight completed safely and efficiently. That’s delivering on everyones expectations, both for the company’s business of course, but also for passengers who need to get where they are going.

What challenges did you overcome on your journey to becoming an airline pilot?

Being the son of two public school teachers, in a Latin-Italian household, within the context of a developing country with a small aviation industry, my parents made three things crystal clear for me when, at age 10, I said I wanted to become a pilot:

  1. A University degree was required first and foremost;

  2. I would have to own the roof over my head next; and

  3. I would have to pay my own way through all of flight school and time building.

Graduates from APS MCC class 1815 who are now all flying commercially as first officers. From left to right, Martin (Flybe), Byron (Ryanair), Fabrizio (Ryanair), Simone (Ryanair), Massimiliano (Ryanair) and Aaron (Flybe),

Graduates from APS MCC class 1815 who are now all flying commercially as first officers. From left to right, Martin (Flybe), Byron (Ryanair), Fabrizio (Ryanair), Simone (Ryanair), Massimiliano (Ryanair) and Aaron (Flybe),

What advice would you give yourself at the start of your airline journey if you could?

You’d better want it harder than anything else. And then, a famous phrase that ought to resonate the loudest and most often than anything else: “Never give up, never surrender.”

If you weren’t an airline pilot what would you be?

I would go back to my previous career as a Corporate Consultant. I had the chance to work and learn from the brightest people across many industries and loved it all through thick and thin.

When did you land your first airline job?

February 2019, 27 years after that very first flight with my family on that C172. 

What aircraft are you currently flying for your airline?

I will be flying Embraer Jets. 

For those thinking about becoming an airline pilot, would you recommend it, and why?

Those who truly want it don’t need a recommendation to pursue the career as an option between many. What you should be looking for are words of encouragement and tips on how to become simply relentless. 

Martin (right) and his simulator training partner Byron (left), accompanied by Ben (centre) of VA Airline Training upon completion of their APS MCC.

Martin (right) and his simulator training partner Byron (left), accompanied by Ben (centre) of VA Airline Training upon completion of their APS MCC.

Martin in VAs Boeing 737 simulator during his APS MCC training.

Martin in VAs Boeing 737 simulator during his APS MCC training.